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PostWatch: An irregular correction to the Washington Post


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PostWatch
 

Tuesday, January 28, 2003
 
1:36 PM

Then there's this from a flattering Style section profile by Jennifer Frey of the National Women's Law Center's Linda Greenberger:

"The truth is, men's baseball, soccer and lacrosse have all increased in numbers and more men's teams have been added," she says. "Of course, women's opportunities have expanded at a greater rate, but they were starting from such a disadvantaged place." [true as far as it goes--PW]

And a major concern is that people just don't know that this is happening. That people have the false belief that it would take an act of Congress or a major court decision to change the heart of Title IX. The truth is the commission, which has been meeting with little fanfare in light of all the other issues drawing national attention at the moment, can recommend changes that the Bush administration can institute with a mere stroke of a pen.



By the way, in graf 2 above, that's Frey talking, not Greenberger. And it's pretty funny, since the gender-quota interpretation of Title IX was the work not of elected legislators but of bureaucrats working behind the scenes, such as Bill Clinton's Office of Civl Rights chief Norah Cantu.

But here's a rundown from the College Sports Council:


• In 1979, there were 107 men's gymnastic teams at NCAA schools; there are now 20 men's college teams.

• In 1985 there were 253 male athletes per NCAA campus. In 2001 there were 199 male athletes per NCAA campus.

• In 2001, the NCAA has 580 more women's teams than men's teams.

• Participants in collegiate intramural sports, which are totally interest-driven, are about 78% male.

• Track and Field has lost over 91 men's intercollegiate programs since 1991.

• Wrestling has been dropped at over 430 colleges since 1972.

• There are currently 600 more women's teams than men's teams in the NCAA. This is after a decade of proportionality has caused the loss of thousands of male athletes through forced squad size reductions and the dropping almost 400 men's teams.



There's more.




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